Summertime salads

With the wondrous fresh bounty in our veggie plots, markets and shops, it seems a no brainer that we make the very most of summer ‘s fresh ingredients with some simply delicious main course salads – add a few slices of sushi grade salmon or a local soft goat cheese and summer never tasted do good.

Salmon sashimi salad with quinoa and miso dressing

Serves: 4

150g red or white quinoa

60g baby Asian salad leaves

12 radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced

100g podded Edamame beans

1 small avocado, peeled, stoned and cut into wedges

400g sashimi-grade salmon fillet*

2 tablespoons black sesame seeds

a handful of chives, snipped

chive flowers, optional

Dressing

80ml mirin

75ml sake

1 tablespoon caster sugar

2 tablespoons white miso paste

1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

2 teaspoons soy sauce

1 teaspoon sesame oil

Place the quinoa in a small saucepan with 300ml water. Bring to the boil and simmer gently, uncovered for 10-15 minutes until the grains are al dente and water absorbed. Set aside to cool in the pan.

Make the dressing. Place the mirin, sake and caster sugar in a small saucepan. Heat gently, stirring until it reaches the boil. Simmer for 1 minute, then set aside to go cold. Whisk in the remaining ingredients until evenly combined.

Transfer the quinoa to a bowl and stir through the salad leaves, radish slices and edamame beans. Add half the dressing, stir well. 

Season the salmon fillets and sprinkle with the sesame seeds, pressing lightly into the flesh. Drizzle with a little oil. Heat a dry frying pan until hot. Add the salmon and cook for 30 seconds each side until just charred on the outside. Cool for 10 minutes and then thinly slice.

Arrange the quinoa salad on plates with the seared salmon and avocado wedges. Scatter over the chives and chive flowers (if using) Drizzle with the remaining dressing to serve.

  • Sashimi grade salmon is available from some good quality fishmongers. Ask your supplier and explain what you are using the fish for as it needs to be super fresh. Also if it is designed specifically to made into sushi it will come as a long thin fillet, ideal for slicing.

BBQ’d Korean chicken Noodle salad 

Serves: 4

500g skinless chicken thighs fillets

200g dried green tea soba noodles

2 carrots, trimmed

1 cucumber, seeded

1 nashi pear

100g bean sprouts

2 little gem lettuce, cut into wedges

a handful coriander leaves

Marinade

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon caster sugar

1 garlic clove, minced

1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 teaspoon crushed black pepper

Dressing

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

2 tablespoons dark soy sauce

2 tablespoons sunflower oil

1 tablespoon clear honey

2 teaspoons sesame oil

1 teaspoons gochujang*

a few micro herbs, to garnish, optional

Cut the chicken into 2cm pieces and place in bowl. Combine the marinade ingredients, pour over the chicken and stir well. Marinate for 2 hours.

Cook the noodles by plunging them into a pan of boiling water. Boil for 4 minutes until al dente. Drain, refresh under cold water and pat dry.

Cut the carrot and cucumber into long thin julienne. Peel, quarter and core the nashi pear and cut the flesh into thin batons. Combine the carrot, cucumber, nashi and bean sprouts. Set aside.

Make the dressing. Toast the sesame seeds in a dry frying pan. Transfer to a spice grinder and grind to a powder. Place in a bowl and stir in the remaining dressing ingredients. Set aside.

Preheat the griddle pan until hot. Thread the chicken pieces onto metal or bamboo skewers and griddle for 3-4 minutes each side until charred and tender. Rest for 5 minutes. 

Arrange the noodles in bowls and top with the salad, scatter over the micro herbs, if using. Drizzle over the dressing and serve with the skewers of chicken on the side. 

  • Gochujang is a red chilli spice paste with a sweet, spicy flavour. It is widely used in Korean cooking and is available from specialist food stores or online. 

Marinated buffalo mozzarella with orange and fennel with basil oil

Serves: 4

4 x 150g balls buffalo mozzarella

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2-4 oranges, depending on size

1 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 small head fennel, trimmed

2 teaspoons lemon juice

1 teaspoon honey

75g Niçoise olives, pitted

60g picked watercress leaves

Basil oil

60g basil leaves

150ml extra virgin olive oil

salt

a few edible flowers, such as primulas or nasturtiums, to garnish, optional 

Place the mozzarella balls in a bowl. Finely grate the zest and squeeze the juice of 1 orange into a bowl. Stir in the olive oil and season to taste. Lightly toast the fennel seeds and bash with a pestle and mortar. Add to the marinade and pour over the mozzarella. Set aside until required.

Make the basil oil. Wash the basil leaves in cold water. Then blanch the leaves in boiling water for 1 minute. Drain and immediately refresh in iced water. Drain again and dry really well with paper towel. Place in a liquidizer with the oil and a little  salt and puree until really fine. Strain the oil through a fine sieve (reserve both the basil pulp and oil, separately).

Peel and cut the remaining oranges into then slices. Shave the fennel into fine slices using a mandolin (or sharp knife) reserving any fronds. Remove the mozzarella balls from the marinade and strain the juices into a bowl. Stir the lemon juice and honey into the marinade to use as the dressing.

Arrange the mozzarella on plates with the shaved fennel, orange slices, olives and watercress leaves. Drizzle over the marinade dressing, basil oil and some pepper. Serve scattered with fennel fronds and edible flowers, if using.

  • Tip: what to do with the basil pulp. There is still a good flavour in the basil pulp so add a little salt and pepper and toss through pasta. 

Carpaccio of courgette, melted goat cheese and lemon with warm honey 

Serves: 4

2 large courgettes

60g baby spinach leaves

a handful fresh basil leaves

1 lemon

21/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 sprigs fresh lemon thyme or savory, chopped

200g goat cheese

4 tablespoons clear honey 

4 tablespoons toasted pine nuts

25g Parmesan, shaved

Using a mandolin, very thinly shave the courgettes lengthways. Arrange the slices on 4 serving plates, overlapping them to fit, if necessary. Take the courgette trimmings (there will be side

pieces left) and grate then on a box grater. Arrange the grated courgette in the centre of each plate. Top with the spinach and basil leaves.

Grate the lemon zest and set aside. Squeeze the juice into a bowl and whisk in 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, salt and pepper. Spoon about half of the dressing over the courgette carpaccio, set the rest of the dressing aside.

Preheat the grill to medium. Slice the goat cheese into rounds (if not bought as individual rounds) and arrange on a piece of oiled tin foil, on baking tray. Drizzle with the remaining olive oil and scatter over the reserved grated lemon zest, chopped thyme or savory and some black pepper. Warm under the grill for 30 seconds or so until just starting to soften.

Meanwhile, warm the honey in a small saucepan until it just starts to bubble. Remove from the heat.

Carefully slide the warm cheese onto the courgettes and scatter over the spinach and basil leaves, pine nuts and shavings of Parmesan. Pour the remaining lemon dressing over the top and finally drizzle the salad with the heated honey. Serve.

Seared tuna salad with crisp flatbreads and aubergine salsa

Serves: 4

2 flat breads or flour tortilla

1/2 teaspoon baharat spice*

4 x 125g tuna steaks

100g Greek yogurt

2 teaspoons tahini paste

2 Lebanese cucumbers, sliced into wedges

50g rocket leaves

Aubergine salsa

1 medium aubergine, trimmed

1/4 red onion, finely diced

2 teaspoons red wine vinegar

1/2 small garlic clove, crushed

125g cherry tomatoes, quartered

2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

grated zest and juice 1/2 lemon

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 teaspoons honey 

1 teaspoon pomegranate molasse

sea salt and pepper

sunflower for deep frying

Roll the flatbreads up and cut into thin slices to form strips about 5mm thick. Heat about 5cm of sunflower oil in a deep frying pan until hot (check by frying ne strip of bread, it should sizzle as soon as it enters the oil). Fry the bread strips, in batches over a high heat for 1-2 minutes until crisp and golden. Drain on paper towel, transfer to a bowl and add the spice mix and sea salt. Toss and set aside.

Heat a ridged griddle pan until hot. Cut the aubergine lengthways into thin slices about 5mm thick. Brush the slices with oil and season with salt and pepper. Griddle for 4-5 minutes each side until charred and soft. Let cool and then dice the flesh.

Meanwhile, place the diced onion in a bowl, add the vinegar and let soak for 10 minutes. Drain.

Combine the diced aubergine, infused onion, garlic, cherry tomatoes, mint and lemon zest. Season and stir well. Whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, honey, pomegranate molasses and season to taste. Stir about half through the salsa.

Preheat a griddle pan until hot. Season the tuna fillets and sear over a high heat for 30-60 seconds until cooked to your liking. Rest for 5 minutes. 

Beat the Greek yogurt and tahini together until smooth and season to taste.

Spread a little tahini on plates and top with the aubergine salsa, tuna fillets, rocket leaves and crisp flatbreads. Drizzle over the remaining dressing and serve..

  • Baharat spice is a Middle Eastern/North African spice mix traditional used to flavour meats. You can buy it online or from specialist food stores.

© Recipes Louise Pickford

© Photographs Ian Wallace

First published by Food & Travel magazine August 2018


Upcoming food styling & photography workshop

“Come and join us in the beautiful French countryside for 6 days of cooking, styling, photography, eating, drinking and making friends. If it sounds perfect, well that’s because it is!”

custom-Custom_Size___Food Photography and Styling Workshop C

For anyone with a passion for food, food styling or food photography, this 6 day course is a perfect way to improve your skills as I join up with acclaimed food and lifestyle photographer Ian Wallace. This amazing course will take place in the stunning workshop accommodation venue Les Soeurs Anglaises in the Dordogne.

In June this year, Ian and I will be sharing all the knowledge we have gained from our years of experience working in food publishing. The course will include demonstrations, discussions and practical hands-on classes over the 6 days and covers all the skills needed to produce your own beautiful food images. Alongside the daily classes, all meals will be provided accompanied by wines from the region. There will also be a visit to local brocantes to source vintage props and time off to explore the local area, stunning villages and food markets.

“This is a totally immersive course for lovers of good food, budding food bloggers, food stylists and photographers, set in a truly beautiful setting with a relaxed ambience and wonderful food and wine”

Our workshops are the perfect platform for small business owners who want to improve the quality of their images for both website use and social media content. It can help chef’s looking to market themselves and their food. Food bloggers who want to improve their food styling and photographic skills. Even food stylist looking to get involved in the food publishing industry. Lovers of good food and wine with a penchant for France and all it’s charm.


What’s on offer 

We have access to really beautiful settings where we can shoot on location

We will learn how to prepare and cook food, style it and plate it for a perfect food shot.
You can only take a beautiful still life image of an ingredient if you can source them in the first place. We shop at local food markets or help ourselves to home grown veggies.

The Venue

The course is hosted Katie Elliot Armitage co/owner of the fabulous workshop accommodation venue Les Soeurs Anglaises in the Dordogne in South West France. Katie has been running workshops here for over 10 years and after many successful textile and music workshops Katie is looking to offer more food and wine based courses. Set on the outskirts of a pretty French town, the venue nestles in beautiful gardens, surrounded by rolling hills and fields full of sunflowers, cereals and sweetcorn. The stunning workshop is in a converted barn with cathedral ceilings and a vast wall of glass that opens up to invite the outdoors in. The atmosphere is one of calm seclusion, a perfect environment for learning, relaxing, entertaining and eating.

 

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A hint at what lies beyond the two huge workshop doors – this is a truly beautiful environment in which to work – it will inspire you.

 

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And then of course, after all the hard work is done, there will be plenty of time to kick back and enjoy the pool and other recreational area of the property.

 


Itinerary

Each workshop is bespoke. We like to look at what is going on at the time in the local area so we can take you out to photograph a market, producers or festivals depending on what is happening. We can also use the extensive grounds or the workshop at our accommodation. That said, all courses include the following criteria in order to ensure you get the maximum information in order to create your own stunning images.

 

custom-Custom_Size___Food photography and Styling Workshop A

Ian going through some of the basics of setting up a food shot

Getting to grips with your DSLR camera and look at composition

Sourcing props at home…… and at the local brocante
How to prepare and cook food for photography

Shooting light and dark and how it affects food

 


What is included

Six days/seven nights in one of the beautiful ensuite rooms at Les Souers Anglaises

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Double ensuite bedroom

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Twin ensuite bedroom

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One of the two lovely pools

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Breakfast, lunch and dinner provided. Breakfast by the pool with locally sourced pastries, fresh juices. A light salad lunch and a three course dinner with wines form the region.


Tuition

As well as the above, all your tuition costs with internationally acclaimed food photographer Ian Wallace and food writer, stylist and cook book author Louise Pickford.

There will be hands on practical shoots, outdoors when possible with all the food and props provided.

At the end of the stay you will receive a handout package including a copy of all the images and all the recipes.


Dates 

 

The course runs from June 6th – June 11th

 


Prices

A: Luxury double bedroom en suite (single occupancy) : £2450

B: Luxury double bedroom en suite (shared occupancy)£1950

C: Standard twin bedroom with shared bathroom (single occupancy)£2100 

D: Standard twin bedroom with shared bathroom (shared occupancy)£1550

For the Food Styling & Photography Workshop we require a £400 non-refundable deposit to secure a booking, the full balance being payable two months prior to the start of the workshop.

Flights are not included but we can arrange to collect you from Bordeaux or Bergerac airports or from the train station at Angouleme, this has a direct high speed train link from Paris.

 


Your tutors

Louise Pickford has been writing about and styling food for over 25 years in both London and Sydney, where she was involved in recipe writing and development, styling the props as well as the food for shoots. She became  food editor on several glossy magazine as well as styling a host of books for Bauer Media’s Woman’s Weekly titles. Recently Louise and Ian relocated to SW France where they continue to work together for clients around the world including Delicious Magazine Australia, the UK and Holland, Food & Travel Magazine, Grazia UK and The Mail on Sunday. She has written more than 30 cookery books to date, including over a dozen for bespoke publishers Ryland, Peters & Small.

Ian Wallace has built a very successful career working in both London and Sydney for clients that included all the main book publishers, and top food  magazine titles and Sunday newspaper supplements, shooting a mixture of editorial, packaging and advertising, clients including Marks and Spencer, Vogue Entertaining and Travel, Delicious Magazine Australia and UK, Gourmet Traveller, The Mail on Sunday and Food and Travel Magazine as well as photographing many book titles for Bauer Media and News Life Media and Ryland Peters and small.

 

BOOK SOON TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT

For more information about the accommodation, course or to book please go to Les Soeurs Anglaises