Recipe of the week……………duck salad

Duck Salad

Sesame and soy duck fillets and green papaya salad

Serves: 4

Green papaya is a used extensively in Thai and South East Asian cooking where it is traditionally served as a refreshing salad. The slightly tart quality of the fruit absorbs the sweet salty dressing perfectly, a perfect foil to the richly flavoued duck.

4 x 200 g duck breast fillets

1 tbs soy sauce

1 tbs fish sauce

2 tsp caster sugar

1 tsp sesame oil

750 g green papaya, peeled, halved and  seeded

2 Lebanese cucumbers, thinly sliced

1/2 bunch each fresh Thai basil, coriander and mint

125 g grape cherry tomatoes, halved

4 tbs dry roasted peanuts, finely chopped

dressing

3 tbs fish sauce

3 tbs caster sugar

2 1/2 tbs fresh lime juice

2 small red chillies, thinly sliced and seeded if wished

sea salt

Thai crispy fried shallots, to garnish

Marinate the duck. Combine the marinade ingredients in a bowl. Score the skin of each duck breast several times with a sharp knife, add to the marinade, cover with cling wrap and chill for 4 hours.

Preheat the oven to 200c. Remove the duck from the marinade and rub dry with kitchen paper, sprinkle the skin with sea salt. Heat a heavy based ovenproof frying pan and sear the duck skin down form 1 minute until golden. Turn the duck breast oven, transfer to the oven and roast for 8-10 minutes until cooked through. Remove from the oven and rest for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, thinly slice the papaya and cut into long thin strips or julienne. Place in a bowl and add the cucumber, herbs and cherry tomatoes. Whisk together the fish sauce, sugar and lime juice until the sugar is dissolved and stir in the chillies.

Thinly slice the duck breast and add to the salad with the dressing. Toss well, divide between plates and serve scattered with the peanuts and the fried shallots.


Slurp……….

Twelve months ago (hard to believe how fast last year passed by) I was in London working on my latest cook book for best ever publishers Ryland, Peters & Small. The book, Oodles of Noodles was published later in the year and has been very well received – it’s always a thrill to know that not only has a book been published, but people have bought, read and cooked from it – so I wanted to share some of the recipes over the next few weeks.

The recipes were inspired by my travels throughout Asia as well as my years spent in Sydney which is chock full of Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Indonesian and Korean restaurants. Hopefully you will enjoy cooking and eating them as much as I did researching, developing, writing and testing the recipes.

I also hope you enjoy the evocative images so beautifully shot by Ian Wallace and styled by the very talented stylist Tony Hutchinson. Thanks also to to Sonia, Leslie and Julia at RPS.

I am beginning with the title recipe, a fabulous Vietnamese soup. Enjoy…….

Vietnamese beef pho

RPS1796_Pho bo copy

Serves: 4

When I am visiting a city with a Vietnamese population I always try and make a trip to wherever the majority of Vietnamese have settled so I can treat myself to an authentic beef pho. It’s the large baskets of colourful herbs and condiments that give this classic soup its freshness and that unique flavour and texture I love so much.

1 kg beef short ribs

5 cm piece root ginger, sliced and bruised

1 onion, sliced

2 garlic cloves, sliced

3 whole star anise, bruised

2 cinnamon sticks, bruised

400 g dried rice stick noodles

350 g beef fillet, thinly sliced

3 tablespoons fish sauce

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon caster sugar

juice 1 lime

125 g bean sprouts, trimmed

garnishes

2 red bird’s eye chillies, chopped

a handful each of fresh Thai basil, Vietnamese mint and coriander

6 spring onions, trimmed and sliced

Put the beef ribs in a large saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Simmer fast for 10 minutes then drain and wash ribs. Return ribs to the pan and add 2 litres more cold water along with the ginger, onion, garlic, star anise and cinnamon sticks. Bring to the boil and simmer gently for 11/2 hours or until the meat is tender.

Remove the ribs from the stock and set aside to cool. Thinly shred the meat discarding bones. Strain the stock through a fine sieve and let cool. Refrigerate both the meat and the stock overnight.

The next day, soak the noodles in hot water for 20 minutes, drain and shake dry. Divide noodles between 4 large soup bowls. Meanwhile, remove the layer of fat from the cold stock and return the pan to the heat until boiling. Stir in the shredded meat, raw beef, fish sauce, salt, sugar and lime juice. Spoon the soup over the noodles and top with the bean sprouts. Serve soup with a plate of the garnishes in the middle of the table for everyone to help themselves.

 

 

 

 

 

 



A right falafel

Falafels are little nuggets of pulses, herbs and spices served as street food in Middle Eastern and North African countries. They are cooked and served in flat bread wraps with salad and tahini dressing. Traditionally they are made with chickpeas but here I have made two versions, firstly replacing the chickpeas with bulghar wheat to make a homemade falafel, whilst the second recipe not only returns to the classic chickpea falafel but uses a ready made falafel mix available from supermarkets and specialist food stores – making a really quick and simple mid-week supper dish.

Bulghar wheat falafel with courgette and haloumi salad 

 This recipe can be served as either a salad or as a wrap, it’s up to you – both a equally yummy.Bulghar falafel serve

Serves: 4

250 g bulghar wheat

1 bunch spring onions

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 bunch coriander leaves (about 30g)

1 tsp ras al hanout*

1 tbs chickpea* or rice flour

1 tbs tahini paste

juice 1 lemon

200 g baby courgettes

1 small cucumber

haloumi, thinly sliced

a handful rocket leaves

a few fennel or edible flowers (optional)

Preserved lemon yogurt

1 tbs finely chopped preserved lemon

150 g Greek yogurt

1 teaspoon clear honey

1 tbs chopped fresh coriander

salt and pepper

vegetable oil for shallow frying

flat breads, to serve

Pour boiling water over the bulghar wheat and leave to soak for 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly and place in a food processor. Add the onions, garlic, coriander, ras al haout, chickpea flour, tahini paste, 1 teaspoon salt and a little pepper and blend to form a smooth green paste. Shape into 32 oval patties and set aside. 

Make the preserved lemon yogurt dressing. Place the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and speckled green. Very thinly slice the courgettes and cucumber (using a mandolin or potato peeler). Place in a bowl and add the rocket and a coriander leaves.

Heat 5 cm oil in a wok or saucepan and fry the falafel for 5 minutes until evenly browned, turning halfway through. Drain well on kitchen paper. Arrange the salad on a platter and top with the falafel. Serve with the yogurt dip, edible flowers if using and some flat bread.

* Ras al hanout is a Middle Eastern spice mix available from some supermarkets or specialist food stores. Chickpea flour is also known as gram flour and is also available from most larger supermarkets or specialist food shops.

Couscous salad with falafel and hummus sauce

Couscous and falafel 1

Serves: 4

150 g couscous

3 tbs extra virgin olive oil

3 ripe plum tomatoes, seeded and chopped

1 bunch roughly chopped fresh mint

1 bunch roughly chopped fresh parsley

2 tbs lemon juice

225 g packet ready-made falafel *

125 g Greek yoghurt

100 g hummus

1 teaspoon toasted cumin seeds

a pinch hot smoked paprika

4 pieces flatbread or pitta pockets, to serve

Place the couscous and 1 tablespoon oil in a heatproof bowl. Add 150 ml boiling water, cover and leave to stand for 5 minutes until the couscous grains are softened. Stir with a fork to separate the grains and then stir in the tomatoes, herbs, lemon juice and 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil. Set aside.

Heat the falafel following packet directions. Meanwhile, combine the yogurt, hummus and half the cumin seeds in a serving dish and drizzle with the remaining oil, cumin seeds and paprika. Serve the hot falafel with the couscous salad, yogurt hummus and flatbread.

Both these recipes were first published by Grazia UK. Photographed by Ian Wallace